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Issue 16
MRC Baboons
Vet Council Continues to obfuscate
Local researchers question animal models
Does Dove give a Rats's *** ?
Proposed Code a 'Vivisector's Charter'
Who'll move the cheese ?
Enchantrix - now country-wide distribution
Vivisection retards medical progress
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VIVISECTION RETARDS MEDICAL PROGRESS


      There is sufficient evidence to show that vivisection continues, not because of any altruistic reason, but because of the vast vested interests involved. What is not so well known is that experimentation on animals actually retards medical progress. Below we cite only a few examples:
  • For decades the tobacco industry traded on research showing that their product did not have cancerous effects on dogs and primates they had used in forced-inhalation experiments. It is now known that this research was not applicable to humans.
  • Defenders of animal experiments commonly cite such cures as penicillin and the polio vaccine as evidence for their case.
      However, it turns out that the discoverer of penicillin, Alexander Fleming, observed as early as 1929 that penicillin killed bacteria in a petri dish but not in bacteria-infected rabbits - and he thereby falsely concluded that penicillin would not cure humans until a decade later when he used it in desperation to save a dying patient.
      Experiments infecting monkeys with the polio virus in the early 1920s and 1930s, by the account of Dr. Albert Sabin, also proved futile because primates and humans contracted the disease differently. It was only in human autopsy research that Dr. Sabin established the correct pathology...
      The polio vaccine itself is now grown in human cell culture because the original vaccine, drawn from primate tissue, had harmful and sometimes lethal side effects.
www.vivisection-absurd.org.uk


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